Her Name Is Rose, by Christine Breen

Her Name Is Rose, by Christine Breen

  I’m really thrilled to be chatting to Christine Breen today as part of the TripFiction and Book Connectors’ Around The World Blog Tour. Basically, the tour is a way of travelling the world by fiction, one country at a time. This month, we’re in Ireland, the setting for Christine’s beautiful book Her Name Is Rose.   Christine is a fellow member of The Prime Writers, which is how I met her. An American, she lives in the fabulously named Kiltumper in the west of Ireland, in the cottage where her grandfather was born. (I can really relate to this: my grandmother came from Kerry, and I’ve felt a huge sense of connection whenever I’ve been there to visit).   Her Name Is Rose opens in the X-ray department of a hospital as Iris has a...

The Good Neighbour, by Beth Miller

The Good Neighbour, by Beth Miller

Minette has been having a tough time with her neighbours so, when they move out, she’s delighted to find that the new family are immediately warm and friendly. Minette pops round to welcome them, and Cath asks her who else lives in the street. Although she’s been there for about a year, Minette’s knowledge is limited: ‘We’re next to you, obviously, that’s me, Abe, and Tilly. Priya’s next to me, she’s really nice, Indian family with kids and her mother living with them. Then opposite, number 36, is Kirsten, who I know because she’s a cranial osteopath and she’s doing a few sessions with Tilly.’ ‘Wow, she has her own osteopath already, impressive.’ God’s sake, Minette, first...

The Penny Heart, by Martine Bailey

The Penny Heart, by Martine Bailey

It’s a cold winter’s evening in 1787, and Michael Croxon is racing to make it onto the Manchester Flyer. His younger brother, Peter, has neglected to make sure he has the right coins for his fare, and there is no guarantee that the coachman will change his pound note. Privileged and comely as the Croxon brothers are, they are no match for the sharp eyes and swift hands of Mary Jebb, ready to change their money with a confidence trick she has used many times before. But she’s not quite fast enough. Michael gives chase and tracks her back to an icy backyard. Though Michael, as a respectable and righteous business man, may have the upper hand, Mary can see through to the depths of his desires, desires he would rather no-one would ever uncover. He...

Reviews of The Summer of Secrets

Reviews of The Summer of Secrets

to everyone who has been kind enough to read The Summer of Secrets and say such lovely things. I keep getting all overwhelmed! I’m just going to put them here for when I’m stuck in the middle of writing #2… ‘Sarah Jasmon’s debut The Summer of Secrets is an evocative and atmospheric coming-of-age story. Set in idyllic countryside, this novel is a meticulous rendering of young friendship.’ CARYS BRAY, author of Costa-shortlisted A SONG FOR ISSY BRADLEY Read full review here   ‘A lovely coming-of-age story about one long hot summer in 1983, when Helen, bored and lonely, meets the bohemian and eccentric Dover family and is immediately cast under their spell especially the capricious Victoria. A wonderfully atmospheric first...

Burnt River, by Karin Salvalaggio

Burnt River, by Karin Salvalaggio

Burnt River is the second in the Macy Greeley Mysteries, the first being Bone Dust White. Macy is a detective in the state police and is based in Helena, the capital city of Montana. She’s been called up to the small town of Wilmington Creek to investigate the murder of a young war veteran, John Dalton, who has been shot in the back of the head outside of a bar in the middle of the night. Wilmington Creek is a quiet place. The sheriff, Aiden Marsh, has been there for seven years and has barely had a crime to solve. Jeremy Dalton, the father of the murdered man, owns one of the largest ranches in the area, and it’s down to his connections with the state governor that Macy has been called in. There’s pressure to get the case solved, and fast. The...

Top Ten Summers in Fiction

Top Ten Summers in Fiction

It is a truth universally acknowledged that wherever there is a ‘best of’ list, there are also an infinite number of alternatives just waiting to prove that they are better. Recently, Naomi Frisby (who writes the excellent blog The Writes of Woman) shared a link on Twitter. It was from The Guardian, and featured Tim Lott’s top 10 summers in fiction. To be honest, my first thought was, ‘Damn, he’s beaten me to it!’. Once I got my head out of my own navel, however, I noticed the rest of Naomi’s tweet: ‘Apparently no women write scenes set in summer…’ Well, two women do make it in for the last two slots on Tim’s list, although one of them – Tove Janssen – has been chosen for The Summer Book, which Tim admires but doesn’t love. So, in the interests of...